Jewellery in Miami

Goldfinger by Bruno Martinazzi Presented By Didier Ltd. At Design Miami/ 2011

 

Design Miami takes place next month, supported by their blog and Twitter feed along the way.

London jewellery gallery Didier will be there for the first time, showing works from artists including Alexander Calder, Louise Nevelson, George Rickey,  Arnaldo Pomodoro, Fernand Leger, Claude Lalanne, and two up-and-coming artists called Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali. According to owner Didier Haspeslagh, "The pieces we are showcasing at the fair are truly miniature works of art and sculpture that can be worn. They are not pieces of jewelry in the conventional sense where the carat of the diamond and the weight of the gold is paramount. Our jewels are art and design," explains Gallery Owner .

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The ten commands of Douglas Rushkoff

Douglas Rushkoff talks about the Internet and economic models in his new talk, Ten Commands for a Digital Era, recently given to Etsy Berlin.

 

 

 

It's a good piece, made all the better when you watch it here - over on the Smithery Blog - Smithery being the business of none other than John V Willshire. John has added his commentary and some lovely photos, making it all the more thought-provoking.

BBC Radio Wales

BBC Radio Wales

 

Required listening tonight on BBC R3:

 

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales launches this year's BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking festival of ideas with a lecture on how the internet will continue to radically change our world

American internet entrepreneur Jimmy Wales has created the most referenced source of knowledge on the planet. His ever-expanding invention Wikipedia has over 19 million free articles, is one of the internet's top five websites, and has revolutionised our access to information. Time magazine named him one of the world's most influential people.

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A wall of Facebook

There's power in the status update. That atomised, ephemeral piece of content can move markets, politics, and people. It has contributed to massive social change; it has contributed to the creation, and closure, of massive businesses; and it has fundamentally changed the relationship between the self and others.

 

Self Portrait Postcards. Image by courtesy of Rishi Dastidar and Matt Busher

 

The spontaneity of the status update does not lessen its power to create tremendous emotional impact. When brevity is the order of the day, something said in less than 200 characters can be shocking, jolting, and harsh. Whatever is written in a status update, it is part of the self, the body politic; it can possess emotional currency that has as much lasting value as the longest book.

This currency is celebrated in an exhibition recently held by Mandatory Thinking – a duo, made up of Rishi Dastidar and Matt Busher - at the Her House Gallery in Hoxton, London. Entitled Self Portrait Postcards, it displays 1000 of Dastidar's Facebook updates as colourful A5 postcards. The result is a mosaic of experiences captured in short form.

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In conversation with... Cathy Bennett and Morgan Silk

Cathy Bennett, Morgan Silk. Photos by courtesy of Ellery PR

 

What is the the impact of connected technology on photography? If it isn't the ability to access millions of images at once and to access quality self-published work through Flickr, it's the total change in process and the relationship between brand, client, and the photographer themselves. How does all of this affect the professional photographer, and the role of the photography agency?

We asked two members of photography agency Vue - photographer Morgan Silk, and founder Cathy Bennett - for their views on how professional photography is changing through this multiplicity of impacts.

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Liz Akers: Accountable social media is no longer an oxymoron

Liz Akers

Oh, how times have changed. Before the Internet, people in marketing were never as exact as they are today. Remember the old days of direct mail campaigns? When you sent out leaflets with different scratch codes (remember them?) and the campaign's ROI would depend on how many order forms you got from that particular scratch code? At that time, if there was no other marketing activity around, you could usually attribute sales around the time of the campaign to the direct mail piece.

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Creative looting

Creative looting

 

Creative Looting: Whose idea is it anyway? is the new event from our friends at Creative Social:

 

We look at personal inspiration or 'stealing' from comics, where the likes of Justice League and The Fantastic Four have helped shape the digital ideas of today though to 'Good cop, bad cop', Being creative is all a bit of a head f* k really. Mind manipulation, mental institutions, loosing the plot, investigations and finding the gems! Do you play it safe or take risk?

We debate the accessibility of ideas with 'Head In The Cloud', where someone is sitting very still on a virtual hilltop inhaling the digital exhaust fumes.

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Facebook on CD

Facebook on CD

 

"Dear Facebook, can I have all my personal data on CD please?"

Why, yes you can:

 

What [Max Schrems] the 24-year-old Austrian law student didn't expect, though, was 1,222 pages of data on a CD. It included chats he had deleted more than a year ago, "pokes" dating back to 2008, invitations to which he had never responded, let alone attended, and hundreds of other details.

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My eyes!

My eyes!

With the article title of the year, Sucking our brains out through our eyes, George Monbiot lays into advertising as part of the commercial ecosystem that supports journalism and content. The final para sums the article's views up quite nicely: 

 

I detest this poison, but I also recognise that I am becoming more dependent on it. As sales of print editions decline, newspapers lean even more heavily on advertising. Nor is the problem confined to the commercial media. Even those who write only for their own websites rely on search engines, platforms and programmes ultimately funded by advertising. We’re hooked on a drug that is destroying society. As with all addictions, the first step is to admit to it.

 

Article here.

Random access memory

Memory is ambiguous. It gives us comfort, but also a sense of the eerie, the unchartered; we are often uncertain, untrusting of our own memory, particularly when recollections by others of the same event, appear to jeapordise our own thoughts. It is entirely based within physical matter, but like the "soul", it has an unreal, ethereal quality. Artist Kerry Tribe's recent work investigates memory, forgetfulness, ambiguity, and doubt, using recordable media to show the extremities of something that we – literally – take for granted.

 

Paul Luckraft

 

Paul Luckraft, curator at Modern Art Oxford, collaborated with London's Camden Arts Centre and Bristol's Arnolfini to commission new work by three contemporary visual artists; Tribe was proposed by Arnolfini to be the final artist in the series. Her exhibition, Dead Star Light, covers a preoccupation with memory: personal and cultural. The works were made in 2009 and 10; they typify the forensic level of detail and investigation that Tribe puts into both her subject matter, and the way in which she covers and explores it. Many works embody a sense of craft, with Tribe working with animators, audio designers and other specialists in order to realise her work.

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Elliot Reuben: the nonsense of the personal brand

Elliot Reuben. Photo by Melissa Baynes

 

I get a lot of gip about my Twitter account. I swear, make bad and often off-colour jokes, troll major brands and social media consultants for kicks and generally refuse to play the “game.” Considering a history of working in marketing and dealing with brand and PR, am I just killing my personal brand?

I certainly hope so.

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New art/science affinities

New art/science affinities

 

 

New Art/Science Affinities is a 190-page book on contemporary artists, written by four authors (Andrea Grover, Régine Debatty, Claire Evans, Pablo Garcia) in a booksprint over one week. It comes from Carnegie Mellon University - here's some more info from them:

 

"New Art/Science Affinities," which focuses on artists working at the intersection of art, science and technology, was produced by a collaborative authoring process known as a "book sprint." Derived from "code sprinting," a method in which software developers gather in a single room to work intensely on an open source project for a certain period of time, the term book sprint describes the quick, collective writing of a topical book.

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Critical engineering

Critical engineering

 

Julian Oliver, Danja Vasiliev, and Gordan Savi?i? have launched their Critical Engineering Manifesto. It starts:

 

The Critical Engineer considers Engineering to be the most transformative language of our time, shaping the way we move, communicate and think. It is the work of the Critical Engineer to study and exploit this language, exposing its influence.

The Critical Engineer considers any technology depended upon to be both a challenge and a threat. The greater the dependence on a technology the greater the need to study and expose its inner workings, regardless of ownership or legal provision.

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Facebook CTO discusses new mobile platform

Facebook by Johan Larsson, CC licence http://www.flickr.com/photos/johanl/4859806074/sizes/m/in/photostream/

 

The Graun interviews Bret Taylor, Facebook's CTO, on the back of the launch of its new Facebook Platform for Mobile.

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Coastal blip

The walled coastal town of Conwy is unquestionably full of beauty. Its 14th Century church, Stephenson-built railway and views over the north Welsh estuary. It is also a hotbed of creativity; of blippy electronic music, of Dadaist performance, and of consciousness-expanding soundscapes. Bringing these elements to a wider audience is artist and founder of electronica label Blipfonica, Emma Louis.

 

Emma Louis. Photo by courtesy of Alena Grace Wright

 

Louis grew up in the area, at a time when Conwy had a thriving fishing industry, with the quayside a local focal point for trade and activity. Now, these buildings are long gone, although the memories linger, often reawakened by the sounds that are more omnipresent. Her teenage years in the town were signified by one song, The Orb's A huge ever growing pulsating brain that rules from the centre of the Ultraworld - a long, textured, interplanetary soundscape which has clearly influenced Louis' own work.

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Hockney on the technology of art

Resident's Pool by RachelH, CC Licence http://www.flickr.com/photos/bagelmouse/511358488/sizes/m/in/photostream/

 

David Hockney has taken the MIT's Technology Review through his new means of production - banks of cameras, iPads, and iPhones.

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Eno on music

Brian Eno 77 million paintings by Dominic's pics, CC licence http://www.flickr.com/photos/dominicspics/4636996515/sizes/m/in/photostream/

 

The Telegraph has reproduced Brian Eno's Science Museum talk on technology in music, and bizarre instruments:

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In conversation with... Dominic McGonigal and Joscelyn Upendran

Dominic MacGonigal and Jocelyn Upendran. Photos c/o Dominic MacGonigal and Jocelyn Upendran

 

In mid-September, the European Council announced that copyright in sound recordings and performances was to be extended from its current duration of 50 years to 70. Known as Term Extension, this directive has been met with a wide and diverse range of reactions. Implementing Term Extension into national law has to be undertaken within two years.

We asked two experts on copyright and content issues for their views. Dominic's employer PPL licences the use of recorded music on behalf of 45,000 performers and over 5,000 labels; Joscelyn is an advocate of a freer, open culture for content creators and publishers.

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BB outage reduces Abu Dhabi road accidents

Abu Dhabi traffic by Jon Rawlinson, CC licence http://www.flickr.com/photos/london/407845744/sizes/m/in/photostream/

 

A blessing in disguise. The Blackberry outage cut Abu Dhabi's road accident rate by 40%.  

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Art and coding

Caca on Imperica, CC licence http://www.flickr.com/photos/hellocatfood/6204230929/sizes/m/in/photostream/

 

A.N.D is running an conversation piece entitled The Art of Coding, The Coding of Art, featuring interactive artists Golan Levin and Zach Lieberman (also the co-founder of Openframeworks).

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